/tagged/culture/page/2

pinoy-culture:

Recovered artifacts & treasures from the Philippines.
The Angono Petroglyphs

Binangonan, Rizal, Philippines

The Angono petroglyphs is currently the oldest known work of art in the Philippines dating from 3000 BC based on pottery shards and tools found when the carvings and cave was discovered. The carvings are of 127 figures of humans, lizards, frogs. and a turtle. It was discovered in 1965 by Carlos V. Francisco, a mural painter and National Artist of the Philippines awardee, who was leading a Boy Scout troop hike. It is one of the national treasures of the Philippines alongside other national treasures such as the Laguna Copperplate and Manunggul Jar.

As important as they are to our history as a people and nation however, today the petroglyphs are at risk of disappearing forever. Erosion and vandalism are the two major reasons. According to anthropologist Jesus Peralta, “Eventually they will disappear… preservation is out of the question.”

Despite the amount of years since it’s been discover it really hasn’t been studied and not much is known about the cave, the petroglyphs, and the people who stayed in the cave and etched the drawings on the wall and why. What some believe the purpose of the petroglyphs based on various human figures squatting is that it was a place of worship. After all, based on Spanish written records our ancestors were known to worship in caves, often having figures of their ancestors and deities in caves.

Other than the approximate dating of the petroglyphs and cave, which even now isn’t 100% accurate as there hasn’t been an intensive research due to lack of support of the government and lack of finances as well as jobs and pay for the anthropologists who are eager to study this piece of written history, nothing else is really known. The National Museum of the Philippines isn’t supported by the government in studying the petroglyphs of Binangonan, as well as many other caves that have petroglyphs in various parts of the Philippines such as Cagayan Valley, Palawan, Bontoc, and the red hematite handprints in Bohol, let alone continue excavations of sites which are known, but are neglected due to the lack of interest from the government for “more important” things. The lack of funds to support the anthropologists and to enforce security around the cave to discourage the vandalism is something that isn’t helping either. Some of that vandalism is people scratching their names on the walls or just scratching slashes on the figures. 

The Angono Petroglyphs are an important document in our history and culture prior to the Spaniards. It is something left by our ancestors through pictographs, for whatever reason they were carved. Much research still needs to be done before we discover the purpose of the cave and who were the people who stayed and carved in the cave. It is up to us to help preservation and to support the study of the cave as well as other caves and archaeological studies throughout the country as these studies is what will help uncover our precolonial past and with it bring a sense of pride for ourselves and ancestors.

Photo Sources: [x], [x], [x]

timothydelaghetto:

2brwngrls:

scatmancrothers:

Hey! There’s a cool thing happening. ABC is making a pilot for a new sitcom called Far East Orlando and it’s only the second primetime network show featuring an Asian American cast, after Margaret Cho’s show All-American Girl which aired for only one season 20 years ago. This is really encouraging to see and I’m definitely gonna watch it.

people better watch the fuck out of this show

When this shit comes out, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE, my Asian people, can we NOT get overly sensitive about the tiniest things being culturally inaccurate? and can we PLEASE not get offended by minuscule details and try to over analyze everything??? I loved All-American Girl, and even though I was super young when I watched it, I knew how important it was for Asian Americans. That show ended up failing, and it had a lot to do with Asians getting upset over dumb shit like a Japanese actor playing a Korean girl’s dad or the art on the walls and just stupid shit like that. It’s TV, there will be inaccuracies, and there will be a lot of Asian jokes, but let’s just take a deep breath and enjoy that fact that we are comin up!!! 


That’s Asian Jim!!!

timothydelaghetto:

2brwngrls:

scatmancrothers:

Hey! There’s a cool thing happening. ABC is making a pilot for a new sitcom called Far East Orlando and it’s only the second primetime network show featuring an Asian American cast, after Margaret Cho’s show All-American Girl which aired for only one season 20 years ago. This is really encouraging to see and I’m definitely gonna watch it.

people better watch the fuck out of this show

When this shit comes out, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE, my Asian people, can we NOT get overly sensitive about the tiniest things being culturally inaccurate? and can we PLEASE not get offended by minuscule details and try to over analyze everything??? I loved All-American Girl, and even though I was super young when I watched it, I knew how important it was for Asian Americans. That show ended up failing, and it had a lot to do with Asians getting upset over dumb shit like a Japanese actor playing a Korean girl’s dad or the art on the walls and just stupid shit like that. It’s TV, there will be inaccuracies, and there will be a lot of Asian jokes, but let’s just take a deep breath and enjoy that fact that we are comin up!!! 

That’s Asian Jim!!!

(via heyroyay)

pinoy-culture:

The Parol
The Symbolic Pilipin@ Christmas Lantern

A symbolic icon representing the Pilipin@ Christmas, the parol is a star shaped lantern that is traditionally made with bamboo sticks, rice paper, and a candle or oil lamp. Though people still make it this way, it is now also traditionally made with local capiz shells, an indigenous resource in Pilipin@ crafts and designs.

In practically every Pilipin@ home and business you will see a parol hanging by a window lit up with a candle or blinking electric lights that sparkle and change to a rhythm for the more elaborate lanterns. It is a recognizable symbol among Pilipin@s and an important aspect of our culture.

The parol for Christian Pilipin@s represents the star of Bethlehem that guided the Three Wise Men to the manger of the newly-born Jesus Christ. The Pilipin@ Christmas season, the longest one in the world, which starts in September and ending in January, is not complete without the parol, and because of it the lighting of the parol has dubbed the season in the Philippines as “The Festival of Lights”.

Photo Sources: [x], [x], [x], [x]

nprglobalhealth:

Triple Whammy: Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage
The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan’s devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.
Typhoons — known in our part of the world as hurricanes — gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. Tropical oceans are especially warm, which is why the biggest storms, Category 4 and Category 5, emerge there. These storms also intensify when there’s cool air over that hot ocean.
"The Pacific at this time of year is very ripe and juicy for big typhoons," says Kerry Emanuel, a climate scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "Once or twice a year we get a Category 5 typhoon out there."
"But it’s a great rarity, fortunately, that a storm just happens to reach peak intensity when it’s making landfall. And that’s what happened in this case."
As it approached one large island in the Philippines, the storm pushed up into a broad bay. That created a 13-foot storm surge that caused widespread devastation at the head of that bay, in the city of Tacloban.
Mountains also wring rainwater out of storms like these. And then there’s the wind.
"So we had a triple whammy, of surge, very high winds and strong rainfall," Emanuel says
Continue reading.
The map above shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image. (NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory)

nprglobalhealth:

Triple Whammy: Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan’s devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.

Typhoons — known in our part of the world as hurricanes — gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. Tropical oceans are especially warm, which is why the biggest storms, Category 4 and Category 5, emerge there. These storms also intensify when there’s cool air over that hot ocean.

"The Pacific at this time of year is very ripe and juicy for big typhoons," says Kerry Emanuel, a climate scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "Once or twice a year we get a Category 5 typhoon out there."

"But it’s a great rarity, fortunately, that a storm just happens to reach peak intensity when it’s making landfall. And that’s what happened in this case."

As it approached one large island in the Philippines, the storm pushed up into a broad bay. That created a 13-foot storm surge that caused widespread devastation at the head of that bay, in the city of Tacloban.

Mountains also wring rainwater out of storms like these. And then there’s the wind.

"So we had a triple whammy, of surge, very high winds and strong rainfall," Emanuel says

Continue reading.

The map above shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image. (NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory)

(via npr)

bbz:

Because of Haiyan’s very recent devastation, please consider contributing to first-respondents efforts:
If you’re looking for someone missing in the Philippines, or if you have information about someone there, Google.org has launched the Typhoon Yolanda Person Finder. A Google crisis map has also been added to detail evacuation centers and areas designated for relief.
Charities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from around the world are responding to this disaster. Many are detailed below with how they’re providing aid and how you can help them make a difference.
Emergency support
The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) has deployed rescue and relief teams to evaluate the damage in the areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. You can donate to the Philippine Red Cross by selecting the Supertyphoon Yolanda campaign on their donation page. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and Red Cross networks from around the world are supporting the Philippine Red Cross. Many have created specific funds for this disaster, including the American Red Cross, Canadian Red Cross and the British Red Cross.
The Salvation Army is on the ground serving storm survivors, primarily with food, water and shelter. Emergency Disaster Service teams have been providing help since the typhoon hit, but are challenged by the lack of accessible roads to transport goods and medical supplies. The non-profit has set up a designated fund for Haiyan relief efforts, which you can access here. You can also make a donation by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) is working with local authorities, the Filipino Jewish community and their global partners to assist in providing for survivors’ immediate needs. You can support their efforts online or by phone at 1-212-687-6200.
CARE's emergency response teams are coordinating with local partners in the Philippines to provide food, water, shelter and health care for those in need. Their teams in Vietnam are preparing for the potential need there as Typhoon Haiyan continues its devastation. You can support CARE's efforts on their website, or by phone at 1-800-521-2273 within the United States or +1-404-681-2252 outside the U.S.
Catholic Relief Services, the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the U.S., is on the ground helping with water purification, shelter materials and essential living supplies. You can donate to the organization’s efforts online or you can call 1-877-435-7277. You can also type in your phone number on the website and a representative will call you back to take your donation.
Convoy of Hope's Global Disaster Response Team has shipping containers full of food and supplies on the way to the Philippines. The organization is preparing more supplies to be sent like canned goods, hygiene kits and water filtration units. You can visit Convoy of Hope's website to donate funds to their efforts or call 1-417-823-8998.
Mercy Corps is preparing to deliver food, water, temporary shelter and other basic supplies to devastated areas throughout the Philippines. You can support the organization by donating through their website, PayPal, or by calling 1-888-747-7440.
Oxfam America aid teams are on the ground in northern Cebu, northern and eastern Samar and Leyte, in the Eastern Visayas region in the Philippines. They’re working to provide immediate access to water and sanitation materials. You can support this effort by donating online to their Typhoon Haiyan Relief and Recovery Fund, or by phone at 1-800-776-9326.
Adventist Development and Relief Agency's (ADRA) emergency response team is working in Manila and in the province of Bohol to provide food, emergency relief and medical aid to those in need. They have launched an emergency appeal that you can support online or by phone at 1-800-424-2372.
The International Rescue Committee (IRC) has dispatched an emergency team to Manila and launched a $10 million appeal in order to ensure immediate needs like safe water, hygiene and sanitation are met. If you would like to contribute to their efforts, click here.
Operation Blessing International (OBI) has deployed disaster relief teams in multiple locations following the massive devastation from Typhoon Haiyan. The organization is providing clean water and food, emergency shelter materials and medical assistance. To help the charity’s mission, you can make a contribution on their website.
Food and water
The World Food Programme was already providing emergency food assistance in the Philippines following the October earthquake. With these emergency food stocks stretched thin, they’re now mobilizing additional supplies and are flying in 40 tons of fortified biscuits in the coming days. Additional food supplies are needed. You can help these efforts by donating online or by calling 1-202-747-0722 domestically or +39-06-65131 for international calls.
Samaritan’s Purse has sent disaster relief specialists, including water and nutrition experts, to the Philippines to deliver immediate aid. They have launched the Philippines Emergency Relief fund for this disaster, which you can support online or by phone at 1-828-262-1980.
World Vision is responding in the Philippines by first providing emergency food and clean water. They will also work to create child-friendly spaces and help families rebuild from this disaster. They have launched a Philippines Disaster Response Fund that you can support online or by calling 1-888-511-6443.
Action Against Hunger is on the ground providing drinking water and survival kits containing buckets, soap and chlorine tablets. They’re also working to distribute sanitation equipment to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases. They’re requesting assistance and you can help by donating online or by calling 1-877-777-1420.
Shelter
ShelterBox was already in the Philippines providing shelter after the 7.2 earthquake that hit Bohol on October 15. They are now expanding their operations to provide tents and essential equipment for families left homeless after Typhoon Haiyan. You can support their work in the Philippines either online or by calling 1-941-907-6036.
Habitat for Humanity is already providing help to 30,000 families with shelter repair kits to rebuild their damaged homes. You can support this work by donating from the Philippines to their Re-Build Philippines Fund or from the U.S. by contributing to their Disaster Response Fund. You can also make a donation by phone at 1-800-HABITAT.
Architecture for Humanity is mobilizing to assist with post-disaster reconstruction and the organization’s working with local architects to identify the most critical rebuilding needs. You can support their Super Typhoon Haiyan Response online, by calling 1-415-963-3511 or by texting REBUILD to 85944 to make a $10 donation from your mobile phone.
Medical assistance
Americares has an emergency shipment on the way to the Philippines with enough medical aid for 20,000 survivors, including antibiotics, wound care supplies and pain relievers. You can support Americares with an online donation or by calling 1-800-486-4357.
International Medical Corps has pre-positioned medical supplies and their team is on the ground coordinating with their partners in the Philippines to distribute and provide medical aid. You can support their Typhoon Haiyan Emergency Response fund online or by calling 1-800-481-4462.
More than 1.5 tons of emergency medicine and medical supplies are en route to the Philippines from Direct Relief. The supplies include antibiotics, pain relievers, nutritional supplements, antifungal medications, wound dressings and chronic disease medicines. You can call in your donation by dialing 1-805-964-4767 or you can go online to support the organization.
Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) have emergency teams in Cebu city with an additional 50 people including medical personnel, logisticians and psychologists arriving in the Philippines in the next few days. They’ll bring tents, supplies of drugs, medical equipment and material to purify water, as well as essential plastic sheeting, cooking items and hygiene kits. Teams will monitor possible outbreaks of infectious diseases. An additional cargo is being prepared due to leave later this week from Bordeaux with an inflatable hospital and medical material. You can make your donation by calling 1-212- 763-5779 or online.
Helping children
The U.S. Fund for UNICEF is helping children and their families in the Philippines receive shelter, clean water, nutrition and vaccines. Their emergency response can be supported online or by calling 1-800-367-5437. You can also donate directly to UNICEF in the Philippines here.
Save the Children is offering disaster relief support for children in the Philippines, Laos and Vietnam after Typhoon Haiyan. The charity has pre-positioned relief material kits for children and families, which will include toiletries, household cleaning items, temporary school tents and learning materials. You can support their Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund online. You can also donate by phone at 1-800-728-3843.
Emergency response teams from ChildFund International prepositioned supplies, including emergency kits and tents, and made arrangements with local suppliers to access food and non-food relief supplies. The organization is also preparing to setup child- centered spaces where kids can feel safe. Donate to ChildFund online to help children cope and recover confidence after this disaster.
Teams from Plan are also on the ground responding to the needs of children and their families. Their priorities are vulnerable youngsters and communities in rural locations. You can support their appeal on their website.
Source: http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/09/world/iyw-how-to-help-typhoon-haiyan/index.html

bbz:

Because of Haiyan’s very recent devastation, please consider contributing to first-respondents efforts:

If you’re looking for someone missing in the Philippines, or if you have information about someone there, Google.org has launched the Typhoon Yolanda Person Finder. A Google crisis map has also been added to detail evacuation centers and areas designated for relief.

Charities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from around the world are responding to this disaster. Many are detailed below with how they’re providing aid and how you can help them make a difference.

Emergency support

The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) has deployed rescue and relief teams to evaluate the damage in the areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. You can donate to the Philippine Red Cross by selecting the Supertyphoon Yolanda campaign on their donation page. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and Red Cross networks from around the world are supporting the Philippine Red Cross. Many have created specific funds for this disaster, including the American Red Cross, Canadian Red Cross and the British Red Cross.

The Salvation Army is on the ground serving storm survivors, primarily with food, water and shelter. Emergency Disaster Service teams have been providing help since the typhoon hit, but are challenged by the lack of accessible roads to transport goods and medical supplies. The non-profit has set up a designated fund for Haiyan relief efforts, which you can access here. You can also make a donation by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) is working with local authorities, the Filipino Jewish community and their global partners to assist in providing for survivors’ immediate needs. You can support their efforts online or by phone at 1-212-687-6200.

CARE's emergency response teams are coordinating with local partners in the Philippines to provide food, water, shelter and health care for those in need. Their teams in Vietnam are preparing for the potential need there as Typhoon Haiyan continues its devastation. You can support CARE's efforts on their website, or by phone at 1-800-521-2273 within the United States or +1-404-681-2252 outside the U.S.

Catholic Relief Services, the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the U.S., is on the ground helping with water purification, shelter materials and essential living supplies. You can donate to the organization’s efforts online or you can call 1-877-435-7277. You can also type in your phone number on the website and a representative will call you back to take your donation.

Convoy of Hope's Global Disaster Response Team has shipping containers full of food and supplies on the way to the Philippines. The organization is preparing more supplies to be sent like canned goods, hygiene kits and water filtration units. You can visit Convoy of Hope's website to donate funds to their efforts or call 1-417-823-8998.

Mercy Corps is preparing to deliver food, water, temporary shelter and other basic supplies to devastated areas throughout the Philippines. You can support the organization by donating through their website, PayPal, or by calling 1-888-747-7440.

Oxfam America aid teams are on the ground in northern Cebu, northern and eastern Samar and Leyte, in the Eastern Visayas region in the Philippines. They’re working to provide immediate access to water and sanitation materials. You can support this effort by donating online to their Typhoon Haiyan Relief and Recovery Fund, or by phone at 1-800-776-9326.

Adventist Development and Relief Agency's (ADRA) emergency response team is working in Manila and in the province of Bohol to provide food, emergency relief and medical aid to those in need. They have launched an emergency appeal that you can support online or by phone at 1-800-424-2372.

The International Rescue Committee (IRC) has dispatched an emergency team to Manila and launched a $10 million appeal in order to ensure immediate needs like safe water, hygiene and sanitation are met. If you would like to contribute to their efforts, click here.

Operation Blessing International (OBI) has deployed disaster relief teams in multiple locations following the massive devastation from Typhoon Haiyan. The organization is providing clean water and food, emergency shelter materials and medical assistance. To help the charity’s mission, you can make a contribution on their website.

Food and water

The World Food Programme was already providing emergency food assistance in the Philippines following the October earthquake. With these emergency food stocks stretched thin, they’re now mobilizing additional supplies and are flying in 40 tons of fortified biscuits in the coming days. Additional food supplies are needed. You can help these efforts by donating online or by calling 1-202-747-0722 domestically or +39-06-65131 for international calls.

Samaritan’s Purse has sent disaster relief specialists, including water and nutrition experts, to the Philippines to deliver immediate aid. They have launched the Philippines Emergency Relief fund for this disaster, which you can support online or by phone at 1-828-262-1980.

World Vision is responding in the Philippines by first providing emergency food and clean water. They will also work to create child-friendly spaces and help families rebuild from this disaster. They have launched a Philippines Disaster Response Fund that you can support online or by calling 1-888-511-6443.

Action Against Hunger is on the ground providing drinking water and survival kits containing buckets, soap and chlorine tablets. They’re also working to distribute sanitation equipment to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases. They’re requesting assistance and you can help by donating online or by calling 1-877-777-1420.

Shelter

ShelterBox was already in the Philippines providing shelter after the 7.2 earthquake that hit Bohol on October 15. They are now expanding their operations to provide tents and essential equipment for families left homeless after Typhoon Haiyan. You can support their work in the Philippines either online or by calling 1-941-907-6036.

Habitat for Humanity is already providing help to 30,000 families with shelter repair kits to rebuild their damaged homes. You can support this work by donating from the Philippines to their Re-Build Philippines Fund or from the U.S. by contributing to their Disaster Response Fund. You can also make a donation by phone at 1-800-HABITAT.

Architecture for Humanity is mobilizing to assist with post-disaster reconstruction and the organization’s working with local architects to identify the most critical rebuilding needs. You can support their Super Typhoon Haiyan Response online, by calling 1-415-963-3511 or by texting REBUILD to 85944 to make a $10 donation from your mobile phone.

Medical assistance

Americares has an emergency shipment on the way to the Philippines with enough medical aid for 20,000 survivors, including antibiotics, wound care supplies and pain relievers. You can support Americares with an online donation or by calling 1-800-486-4357.

International Medical Corps has pre-positioned medical supplies and their team is on the ground coordinating with their partners in the Philippines to distribute and provide medical aid. You can support their Typhoon Haiyan Emergency Response fund online or by calling 1-800-481-4462.

More than 1.5 tons of emergency medicine and medical supplies are en route to the Philippines from Direct Relief. The supplies include antibiotics, pain relievers, nutritional supplements, antifungal medications, wound dressings and chronic disease medicines. You can call in your donation by dialing 1-805-964-4767 or you can go online to support the organization.

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) have emergency teams in Cebu city with an additional 50 people including medical personnel, logisticians and psychologists arriving in the Philippines in the next few days. They’ll bring tents, supplies of drugs, medical equipment and material to purify water, as well as essential plastic sheeting, cooking items and hygiene kits. Teams will monitor possible outbreaks of infectious diseases. An additional cargo is being prepared due to leave later this week from Bordeaux with an inflatable hospital and medical material. You can make your donation by calling 1-212- 763-5779 or online.

Helping children

The U.S. Fund for UNICEF is helping children and their families in the Philippines receive shelter, clean water, nutrition and vaccines. Their emergency response can be supported online or by calling 1-800-367-5437. You can also donate directly to UNICEF in the Philippines here.

Save the Children is offering disaster relief support for children in the Philippines, Laos and Vietnam after Typhoon Haiyan. The charity has pre-positioned relief material kits for children and families, which will include toiletries, household cleaning items, temporary school tents and learning materials. You can support their Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund online. You can also donate by phone at 1-800-728-3843.

Emergency response teams from ChildFund International prepositioned supplies, including emergency kits and tents, and made arrangements with local suppliers to access food and non-food relief supplies. The organization is also preparing to setup child- centered spaces where kids can feel safe. Donate to ChildFund online to help children cope and recover confidence after this disaster.

Teams from Plan are also on the ground responding to the needs of children and their families. Their priorities are vulnerable youngsters and communities in rural locations. You can support their appeal on their website.

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/09/world/iyw-how-to-help-typhoon-haiyan/index.html

(via crazyk1d)

staff:

Tumblr Tuesday: Typhoon Haiyan Relief Edition
Official GazetteDirect from the Office of the President of the Philippines.
UNICEFInspiring, enlightening updates from UNICEF’s humanitarian efforts around the world. Donations given now help supply health kits, hygiene kits, and clean water to affected Filipino communities.
Oxfam GBA look inside the lives of Filipino children currently living in evacuation zones. Citizens of Great Britain can donate £5 by texting DONATE to 70066.
Doctors Without BordersDocumenting their pursuit of a better cure for TB as well as their emergency responses to natural disasters. Cargo teams are currently prepping supplies to be sent to the Philippines, just one of the 60 countries Doctors Without Borders aids every year.
In Other NewsComprehensive but digestible daily round ups of what’s happening around the world. Stay updated on the most recent news from the Philippines, ways to help, and places to donate money to typhoon survivors.
For more ways to help our friends in the Philippines, look here.

staff:

Tumblr Tuesday: Typhoon Haiyan Relief Edition

Official Gazette
Direct from the Office of the President of the Philippines.

UNICEF
Inspiring, enlightening updates from UNICEF’s humanitarian efforts around the world. Donations given now help supply health kits, hygiene kits, and clean water to affected Filipino communities.

Oxfam GB
A look inside the lives of Filipino children currently living in evacuation zones. Citizens of Great Britain can donate £5 by texting DONATE to 70066.

Doctors Without Borders
Documenting their pursuit of a better cure for TB as well as their emergency responses to natural disasters. Cargo teams are currently prepping supplies to be sent to the Philippines, just one of the 60 countries Doctors Without Borders aids every year.

In Other News
Comprehensive but digestible daily round ups of what’s happening around the world. Stay updated on the most recent news from the Philippines, ways to help, and places to donate money to typhoon survivors.

For more ways to help our friends in the Philippines, look here.

jeffbernat:

This made me tear up a bit. Prayers to the motherland. #PrayForThePhilippines ☀

jeffbernat:

This made me tear up a bit. Prayers to the motherland. #PrayForThePhilippines ☀

(via ohdeezy)

Filipino Creation Story

loveisarevolutionaryact:

image

Creation Story

Acrylic and Marker on Wood

By JL

When the world first began there was no land; there was only the Sea and the Sky, and between them flew a huge, beautiful Kite (a bird similar to a hawk). One day, the bird, which had nowhere to land and rest, grew tired of flying about, and in frustration stirred up the Sky in a quarrel against the Sea. The Sky threw rain, thunder, and lightning that reached the Sea, who in turn rose up and hurled waves and hurricanes that reached the Sky.

 

In order to restrain its fury, the Sky showered a multitude of massive boulders down upon the Sea, which became the islands that formed the Philippines. These islands prevented the waters from rising any more - instead causing them to flow back and forth, and thereby creating the tides. Afterwards, the Sky then ordered the Kite to light on one of the newly-formed islands to build her nest, and to leave the Sea and the Sky in peace. 

Now at this same time the Land Breeze and the Sea Breeze had a child which they named Bamboo. One day, when Bamboo was floating against the sea, it struck the feet of the Kite. Shocked, hurt, and angered that anything should strike it, the bird furiously pecked at the bamboo until it split in half. Out of one section came a golden-bronze colored man, named Malakas (Strong One) and from the other half came a similarly hued woman, named Maganda (Beautiful One). In union they were birthed.

 

 

Man and Womyn, Pinoy and Pinay were born intertwined with one another, in balance and equality they were created.

 

As time has passed we forget the union that we were created in

We forget the seed that grew us,

And man and womyn, Pinoy and Pinay have divided. 

 

 

 

(Excerpt from The Journey of a Brown Girl: An Experimental Theatre Piece by Jana Lynne Umipig)

designersof:

Philippine classic snack brands.

designersof:

Philippine classic snack brands.

(via mintxo)

“There was a person who stood up [after a screening] and said, ‘How could you make a movie that was so denigrating to your race?’,” explained John Cho, who plays Steve, while hanging near a basketball court at L.A.’s Pan Pacific Park. “[Ebert] stood up and said, ‘You wouldn’t say that to a white filmmaker,’ which is probably true.”

Once Ebert loudly came to the flick’s defense, people started paying attention, as he went on to say that Asian-Americans should be free to take on any types of roles they choose without fear of misrepresenting the entire community.

“What is interesting about this movie is, it doesn’t say, ‘This is an Asian-American movie,’ it just presents Asian-American characters,” Cho said, echoing Ebert’s sentiments. “The movie gives itself the freedom to paint negative portrayals.”

“It’s threatening to some people because they want a particular image,” he added. “And we’ve gone away from stereotypes in order to kind of negate these bad stereotypes. You see on TV, it’s all positive model minority cut-out [type characters] — it’s just a function in a scene. What this movie does is give you protagonists that are very deeply flawed. And I think in order for Asian-American cinema to progress, we need to have characters who are deeply flawed.”

And Shen, who plays the main character in “Better Luck Tomorrow,” feels like folks are getting it. “People came up to me and said, ‘After the first five minutes, I totally forgot you guys were Asian,’ ” he said. ” ‘Cause it has nothing to do with being Asian, it’s universal stuff about … kids. Not necessarily that they’re bad or evil, [just] that they sometimes make wrong decisions.” [mtvnews]

(Source: revlovejoy, via 3llwhy)

ohmyasian:

(via leilockheart)2045. Japanese. Learn some basic Japanese with this cute list! 

ohmyasian:

(via leilockheart)

2045. Japanese. Learn some basic Japanese with this cute list! 

(Source: otakuheart, via chideltathetacultural)

pinoy-culture:

Recovered artifacts & treasures from the Philippines.
The Angono Petroglyphs

Binangonan, Rizal, Philippines

The Angono petroglyphs is currently the oldest known work of art in the Philippines dating from 3000 BC based on pottery shards and tools found when the carvings and cave was discovered. The carvings are of 127 figures of humans, lizards, frogs. and a turtle. It was discovered in 1965 by Carlos V. Francisco, a mural painter and National Artist of the Philippines awardee, who was leading a Boy Scout troop hike. It is one of the national treasures of the Philippines alongside other national treasures such as the Laguna Copperplate and Manunggul Jar.

As important as they are to our history as a people and nation however, today the petroglyphs are at risk of disappearing forever. Erosion and vandalism are the two major reasons. According to anthropologist Jesus Peralta, “Eventually they will disappear… preservation is out of the question.”

Despite the amount of years since it’s been discover it really hasn’t been studied and not much is known about the cave, the petroglyphs, and the people who stayed in the cave and etched the drawings on the wall and why. What some believe the purpose of the petroglyphs based on various human figures squatting is that it was a place of worship. After all, based on Spanish written records our ancestors were known to worship in caves, often having figures of their ancestors and deities in caves.

Other than the approximate dating of the petroglyphs and cave, which even now isn’t 100% accurate as there hasn’t been an intensive research due to lack of support of the government and lack of finances as well as jobs and pay for the anthropologists who are eager to study this piece of written history, nothing else is really known. The National Museum of the Philippines isn’t supported by the government in studying the petroglyphs of Binangonan, as well as many other caves that have petroglyphs in various parts of the Philippines such as Cagayan Valley, Palawan, Bontoc, and the red hematite handprints in Bohol, let alone continue excavations of sites which are known, but are neglected due to the lack of interest from the government for “more important” things. The lack of funds to support the anthropologists and to enforce security around the cave to discourage the vandalism is something that isn’t helping either. Some of that vandalism is people scratching their names on the walls or just scratching slashes on the figures. 

The Angono Petroglyphs are an important document in our history and culture prior to the Spaniards. It is something left by our ancestors through pictographs, for whatever reason they were carved. Much research still needs to be done before we discover the purpose of the cave and who were the people who stayed and carved in the cave. It is up to us to help preservation and to support the study of the cave as well as other caves and archaeological studies throughout the country as these studies is what will help uncover our precolonial past and with it bring a sense of pride for ourselves and ancestors.

Photo Sources: [x], [x], [x]

timothydelaghetto:

2brwngrls:

scatmancrothers:

Hey! There’s a cool thing happening. ABC is making a pilot for a new sitcom called Far East Orlando and it’s only the second primetime network show featuring an Asian American cast, after Margaret Cho’s show All-American Girl which aired for only one season 20 years ago. This is really encouraging to see and I’m definitely gonna watch it.

people better watch the fuck out of this show

When this shit comes out, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE, my Asian people, can we NOT get overly sensitive about the tiniest things being culturally inaccurate? and can we PLEASE not get offended by minuscule details and try to over analyze everything??? I loved All-American Girl, and even though I was super young when I watched it, I knew how important it was for Asian Americans. That show ended up failing, and it had a lot to do with Asians getting upset over dumb shit like a Japanese actor playing a Korean girl’s dad or the art on the walls and just stupid shit like that. It’s TV, there will be inaccuracies, and there will be a lot of Asian jokes, but let’s just take a deep breath and enjoy that fact that we are comin up!!! 


That’s Asian Jim!!!

timothydelaghetto:

2brwngrls:

scatmancrothers:

Hey! There’s a cool thing happening. ABC is making a pilot for a new sitcom called Far East Orlando and it’s only the second primetime network show featuring an Asian American cast, after Margaret Cho’s show All-American Girl which aired for only one season 20 years ago. This is really encouraging to see and I’m definitely gonna watch it.

people better watch the fuck out of this show

When this shit comes out, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE, my Asian people, can we NOT get overly sensitive about the tiniest things being culturally inaccurate? and can we PLEASE not get offended by minuscule details and try to over analyze everything??? I loved All-American Girl, and even though I was super young when I watched it, I knew how important it was for Asian Americans. That show ended up failing, and it had a lot to do with Asians getting upset over dumb shit like a Japanese actor playing a Korean girl’s dad or the art on the walls and just stupid shit like that. It’s TV, there will be inaccuracies, and there will be a lot of Asian jokes, but let’s just take a deep breath and enjoy that fact that we are comin up!!! 

That’s Asian Jim!!!

(via heyroyay)

pinoy-culture:

The Parol
The Symbolic Pilipin@ Christmas Lantern

A symbolic icon representing the Pilipin@ Christmas, the parol is a star shaped lantern that is traditionally made with bamboo sticks, rice paper, and a candle or oil lamp. Though people still make it this way, it is now also traditionally made with local capiz shells, an indigenous resource in Pilipin@ crafts and designs.

In practically every Pilipin@ home and business you will see a parol hanging by a window lit up with a candle or blinking electric lights that sparkle and change to a rhythm for the more elaborate lanterns. It is a recognizable symbol among Pilipin@s and an important aspect of our culture.

The parol for Christian Pilipin@s represents the star of Bethlehem that guided the Three Wise Men to the manger of the newly-born Jesus Christ. The Pilipin@ Christmas season, the longest one in the world, which starts in September and ending in January, is not complete without the parol, and because of it the lighting of the parol has dubbed the season in the Philippines as “The Festival of Lights”.

Photo Sources: [x], [x], [x], [x]

nprglobalhealth:

Triple Whammy: Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage
The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan’s devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.
Typhoons — known in our part of the world as hurricanes — gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. Tropical oceans are especially warm, which is why the biggest storms, Category 4 and Category 5, emerge there. These storms also intensify when there’s cool air over that hot ocean.
"The Pacific at this time of year is very ripe and juicy for big typhoons," says Kerry Emanuel, a climate scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "Once or twice a year we get a Category 5 typhoon out there."
"But it’s a great rarity, fortunately, that a storm just happens to reach peak intensity when it’s making landfall. And that’s what happened in this case."
As it approached one large island in the Philippines, the storm pushed up into a broad bay. That created a 13-foot storm surge that caused widespread devastation at the head of that bay, in the city of Tacloban.
Mountains also wring rainwater out of storms like these. And then there’s the wind.
"So we had a triple whammy, of surge, very high winds and strong rainfall," Emanuel says
Continue reading.
The map above shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image. (NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory)

nprglobalhealth:

Triple Whammy: Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan’s devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.

Typhoons — known in our part of the world as hurricanes — gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. Tropical oceans are especially warm, which is why the biggest storms, Category 4 and Category 5, emerge there. These storms also intensify when there’s cool air over that hot ocean.

"The Pacific at this time of year is very ripe and juicy for big typhoons," says Kerry Emanuel, a climate scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "Once or twice a year we get a Category 5 typhoon out there."

"But it’s a great rarity, fortunately, that a storm just happens to reach peak intensity when it’s making landfall. And that’s what happened in this case."

As it approached one large island in the Philippines, the storm pushed up into a broad bay. That created a 13-foot storm surge that caused widespread devastation at the head of that bay, in the city of Tacloban.

Mountains also wring rainwater out of storms like these. And then there’s the wind.

"So we had a triple whammy, of surge, very high winds and strong rainfall," Emanuel says

Continue reading.

The map above shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image. (NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory)

(via npr)

bbz:

Because of Haiyan’s very recent devastation, please consider contributing to first-respondents efforts:
If you’re looking for someone missing in the Philippines, or if you have information about someone there, Google.org has launched the Typhoon Yolanda Person Finder. A Google crisis map has also been added to detail evacuation centers and areas designated for relief.
Charities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from around the world are responding to this disaster. Many are detailed below with how they’re providing aid and how you can help them make a difference.
Emergency support
The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) has deployed rescue and relief teams to evaluate the damage in the areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. You can donate to the Philippine Red Cross by selecting the Supertyphoon Yolanda campaign on their donation page. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and Red Cross networks from around the world are supporting the Philippine Red Cross. Many have created specific funds for this disaster, including the American Red Cross, Canadian Red Cross and the British Red Cross.
The Salvation Army is on the ground serving storm survivors, primarily with food, water and shelter. Emergency Disaster Service teams have been providing help since the typhoon hit, but are challenged by the lack of accessible roads to transport goods and medical supplies. The non-profit has set up a designated fund for Haiyan relief efforts, which you can access here. You can also make a donation by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) is working with local authorities, the Filipino Jewish community and their global partners to assist in providing for survivors’ immediate needs. You can support their efforts online or by phone at 1-212-687-6200.
CARE's emergency response teams are coordinating with local partners in the Philippines to provide food, water, shelter and health care for those in need. Their teams in Vietnam are preparing for the potential need there as Typhoon Haiyan continues its devastation. You can support CARE's efforts on their website, or by phone at 1-800-521-2273 within the United States or +1-404-681-2252 outside the U.S.
Catholic Relief Services, the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the U.S., is on the ground helping with water purification, shelter materials and essential living supplies. You can donate to the organization’s efforts online or you can call 1-877-435-7277. You can also type in your phone number on the website and a representative will call you back to take your donation.
Convoy of Hope's Global Disaster Response Team has shipping containers full of food and supplies on the way to the Philippines. The organization is preparing more supplies to be sent like canned goods, hygiene kits and water filtration units. You can visit Convoy of Hope's website to donate funds to their efforts or call 1-417-823-8998.
Mercy Corps is preparing to deliver food, water, temporary shelter and other basic supplies to devastated areas throughout the Philippines. You can support the organization by donating through their website, PayPal, or by calling 1-888-747-7440.
Oxfam America aid teams are on the ground in northern Cebu, northern and eastern Samar and Leyte, in the Eastern Visayas region in the Philippines. They’re working to provide immediate access to water and sanitation materials. You can support this effort by donating online to their Typhoon Haiyan Relief and Recovery Fund, or by phone at 1-800-776-9326.
Adventist Development and Relief Agency's (ADRA) emergency response team is working in Manila and in the province of Bohol to provide food, emergency relief and medical aid to those in need. They have launched an emergency appeal that you can support online or by phone at 1-800-424-2372.
The International Rescue Committee (IRC) has dispatched an emergency team to Manila and launched a $10 million appeal in order to ensure immediate needs like safe water, hygiene and sanitation are met. If you would like to contribute to their efforts, click here.
Operation Blessing International (OBI) has deployed disaster relief teams in multiple locations following the massive devastation from Typhoon Haiyan. The organization is providing clean water and food, emergency shelter materials and medical assistance. To help the charity’s mission, you can make a contribution on their website.
Food and water
The World Food Programme was already providing emergency food assistance in the Philippines following the October earthquake. With these emergency food stocks stretched thin, they’re now mobilizing additional supplies and are flying in 40 tons of fortified biscuits in the coming days. Additional food supplies are needed. You can help these efforts by donating online or by calling 1-202-747-0722 domestically or +39-06-65131 for international calls.
Samaritan’s Purse has sent disaster relief specialists, including water and nutrition experts, to the Philippines to deliver immediate aid. They have launched the Philippines Emergency Relief fund for this disaster, which you can support online or by phone at 1-828-262-1980.
World Vision is responding in the Philippines by first providing emergency food and clean water. They will also work to create child-friendly spaces and help families rebuild from this disaster. They have launched a Philippines Disaster Response Fund that you can support online or by calling 1-888-511-6443.
Action Against Hunger is on the ground providing drinking water and survival kits containing buckets, soap and chlorine tablets. They’re also working to distribute sanitation equipment to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases. They’re requesting assistance and you can help by donating online or by calling 1-877-777-1420.
Shelter
ShelterBox was already in the Philippines providing shelter after the 7.2 earthquake that hit Bohol on October 15. They are now expanding their operations to provide tents and essential equipment for families left homeless after Typhoon Haiyan. You can support their work in the Philippines either online or by calling 1-941-907-6036.
Habitat for Humanity is already providing help to 30,000 families with shelter repair kits to rebuild their damaged homes. You can support this work by donating from the Philippines to their Re-Build Philippines Fund or from the U.S. by contributing to their Disaster Response Fund. You can also make a donation by phone at 1-800-HABITAT.
Architecture for Humanity is mobilizing to assist with post-disaster reconstruction and the organization’s working with local architects to identify the most critical rebuilding needs. You can support their Super Typhoon Haiyan Response online, by calling 1-415-963-3511 or by texting REBUILD to 85944 to make a $10 donation from your mobile phone.
Medical assistance
Americares has an emergency shipment on the way to the Philippines with enough medical aid for 20,000 survivors, including antibiotics, wound care supplies and pain relievers. You can support Americares with an online donation or by calling 1-800-486-4357.
International Medical Corps has pre-positioned medical supplies and their team is on the ground coordinating with their partners in the Philippines to distribute and provide medical aid. You can support their Typhoon Haiyan Emergency Response fund online or by calling 1-800-481-4462.
More than 1.5 tons of emergency medicine and medical supplies are en route to the Philippines from Direct Relief. The supplies include antibiotics, pain relievers, nutritional supplements, antifungal medications, wound dressings and chronic disease medicines. You can call in your donation by dialing 1-805-964-4767 or you can go online to support the organization.
Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) have emergency teams in Cebu city with an additional 50 people including medical personnel, logisticians and psychologists arriving in the Philippines in the next few days. They’ll bring tents, supplies of drugs, medical equipment and material to purify water, as well as essential plastic sheeting, cooking items and hygiene kits. Teams will monitor possible outbreaks of infectious diseases. An additional cargo is being prepared due to leave later this week from Bordeaux with an inflatable hospital and medical material. You can make your donation by calling 1-212- 763-5779 or online.
Helping children
The U.S. Fund for UNICEF is helping children and their families in the Philippines receive shelter, clean water, nutrition and vaccines. Their emergency response can be supported online or by calling 1-800-367-5437. You can also donate directly to UNICEF in the Philippines here.
Save the Children is offering disaster relief support for children in the Philippines, Laos and Vietnam after Typhoon Haiyan. The charity has pre-positioned relief material kits for children and families, which will include toiletries, household cleaning items, temporary school tents and learning materials. You can support their Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund online. You can also donate by phone at 1-800-728-3843.
Emergency response teams from ChildFund International prepositioned supplies, including emergency kits and tents, and made arrangements with local suppliers to access food and non-food relief supplies. The organization is also preparing to setup child- centered spaces where kids can feel safe. Donate to ChildFund online to help children cope and recover confidence after this disaster.
Teams from Plan are also on the ground responding to the needs of children and their families. Their priorities are vulnerable youngsters and communities in rural locations. You can support their appeal on their website.
Source: http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/09/world/iyw-how-to-help-typhoon-haiyan/index.html

bbz:

Because of Haiyan’s very recent devastation, please consider contributing to first-respondents efforts:

If you’re looking for someone missing in the Philippines, or if you have information about someone there, Google.org has launched the Typhoon Yolanda Person Finder. A Google crisis map has also been added to detail evacuation centers and areas designated for relief.

Charities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from around the world are responding to this disaster. Many are detailed below with how they’re providing aid and how you can help them make a difference.

Emergency support

The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) has deployed rescue and relief teams to evaluate the damage in the areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. You can donate to the Philippine Red Cross by selecting the Supertyphoon Yolanda campaign on their donation page. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and Red Cross networks from around the world are supporting the Philippine Red Cross. Many have created specific funds for this disaster, including the American Red Cross, Canadian Red Cross and the British Red Cross.

The Salvation Army is on the ground serving storm survivors, primarily with food, water and shelter. Emergency Disaster Service teams have been providing help since the typhoon hit, but are challenged by the lack of accessible roads to transport goods and medical supplies. The non-profit has set up a designated fund for Haiyan relief efforts, which you can access here. You can also make a donation by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) is working with local authorities, the Filipino Jewish community and their global partners to assist in providing for survivors’ immediate needs. You can support their efforts online or by phone at 1-212-687-6200.

CARE's emergency response teams are coordinating with local partners in the Philippines to provide food, water, shelter and health care for those in need. Their teams in Vietnam are preparing for the potential need there as Typhoon Haiyan continues its devastation. You can support CARE's efforts on their website, or by phone at 1-800-521-2273 within the United States or +1-404-681-2252 outside the U.S.

Catholic Relief Services, the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the U.S., is on the ground helping with water purification, shelter materials and essential living supplies. You can donate to the organization’s efforts online or you can call 1-877-435-7277. You can also type in your phone number on the website and a representative will call you back to take your donation.

Convoy of Hope's Global Disaster Response Team has shipping containers full of food and supplies on the way to the Philippines. The organization is preparing more supplies to be sent like canned goods, hygiene kits and water filtration units. You can visit Convoy of Hope's website to donate funds to their efforts or call 1-417-823-8998.

Mercy Corps is preparing to deliver food, water, temporary shelter and other basic supplies to devastated areas throughout the Philippines. You can support the organization by donating through their website, PayPal, or by calling 1-888-747-7440.

Oxfam America aid teams are on the ground in northern Cebu, northern and eastern Samar and Leyte, in the Eastern Visayas region in the Philippines. They’re working to provide immediate access to water and sanitation materials. You can support this effort by donating online to their Typhoon Haiyan Relief and Recovery Fund, or by phone at 1-800-776-9326.

Adventist Development and Relief Agency's (ADRA) emergency response team is working in Manila and in the province of Bohol to provide food, emergency relief and medical aid to those in need. They have launched an emergency appeal that you can support online or by phone at 1-800-424-2372.

The International Rescue Committee (IRC) has dispatched an emergency team to Manila and launched a $10 million appeal in order to ensure immediate needs like safe water, hygiene and sanitation are met. If you would like to contribute to their efforts, click here.

Operation Blessing International (OBI) has deployed disaster relief teams in multiple locations following the massive devastation from Typhoon Haiyan. The organization is providing clean water and food, emergency shelter materials and medical assistance. To help the charity’s mission, you can make a contribution on their website.

Food and water

The World Food Programme was already providing emergency food assistance in the Philippines following the October earthquake. With these emergency food stocks stretched thin, they’re now mobilizing additional supplies and are flying in 40 tons of fortified biscuits in the coming days. Additional food supplies are needed. You can help these efforts by donating online or by calling 1-202-747-0722 domestically or +39-06-65131 for international calls.

Samaritan’s Purse has sent disaster relief specialists, including water and nutrition experts, to the Philippines to deliver immediate aid. They have launched the Philippines Emergency Relief fund for this disaster, which you can support online or by phone at 1-828-262-1980.

World Vision is responding in the Philippines by first providing emergency food and clean water. They will also work to create child-friendly spaces and help families rebuild from this disaster. They have launched a Philippines Disaster Response Fund that you can support online or by calling 1-888-511-6443.

Action Against Hunger is on the ground providing drinking water and survival kits containing buckets, soap and chlorine tablets. They’re also working to distribute sanitation equipment to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases. They’re requesting assistance and you can help by donating online or by calling 1-877-777-1420.

Shelter

ShelterBox was already in the Philippines providing shelter after the 7.2 earthquake that hit Bohol on October 15. They are now expanding their operations to provide tents and essential equipment for families left homeless after Typhoon Haiyan. You can support their work in the Philippines either online or by calling 1-941-907-6036.

Habitat for Humanity is already providing help to 30,000 families with shelter repair kits to rebuild their damaged homes. You can support this work by donating from the Philippines to their Re-Build Philippines Fund or from the U.S. by contributing to their Disaster Response Fund. You can also make a donation by phone at 1-800-HABITAT.

Architecture for Humanity is mobilizing to assist with post-disaster reconstruction and the organization’s working with local architects to identify the most critical rebuilding needs. You can support their Super Typhoon Haiyan Response online, by calling 1-415-963-3511 or by texting REBUILD to 85944 to make a $10 donation from your mobile phone.

Medical assistance

Americares has an emergency shipment on the way to the Philippines with enough medical aid for 20,000 survivors, including antibiotics, wound care supplies and pain relievers. You can support Americares with an online donation or by calling 1-800-486-4357.

International Medical Corps has pre-positioned medical supplies and their team is on the ground coordinating with their partners in the Philippines to distribute and provide medical aid. You can support their Typhoon Haiyan Emergency Response fund online or by calling 1-800-481-4462.

More than 1.5 tons of emergency medicine and medical supplies are en route to the Philippines from Direct Relief. The supplies include antibiotics, pain relievers, nutritional supplements, antifungal medications, wound dressings and chronic disease medicines. You can call in your donation by dialing 1-805-964-4767 or you can go online to support the organization.

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) have emergency teams in Cebu city with an additional 50 people including medical personnel, logisticians and psychologists arriving in the Philippines in the next few days. They’ll bring tents, supplies of drugs, medical equipment and material to purify water, as well as essential plastic sheeting, cooking items and hygiene kits. Teams will monitor possible outbreaks of infectious diseases. An additional cargo is being prepared due to leave later this week from Bordeaux with an inflatable hospital and medical material. You can make your donation by calling 1-212- 763-5779 or online.

Helping children

The U.S. Fund for UNICEF is helping children and their families in the Philippines receive shelter, clean water, nutrition and vaccines. Their emergency response can be supported online or by calling 1-800-367-5437. You can also donate directly to UNICEF in the Philippines here.

Save the Children is offering disaster relief support for children in the Philippines, Laos and Vietnam after Typhoon Haiyan. The charity has pre-positioned relief material kits for children and families, which will include toiletries, household cleaning items, temporary school tents and learning materials. You can support their Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund online. You can also donate by phone at 1-800-728-3843.

Emergency response teams from ChildFund International prepositioned supplies, including emergency kits and tents, and made arrangements with local suppliers to access food and non-food relief supplies. The organization is also preparing to setup child- centered spaces where kids can feel safe. Donate to ChildFund online to help children cope and recover confidence after this disaster.

Teams from Plan are also on the ground responding to the needs of children and their families. Their priorities are vulnerable youngsters and communities in rural locations. You can support their appeal on their website.

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/09/world/iyw-how-to-help-typhoon-haiyan/index.html

(via crazyk1d)

staff:

Tumblr Tuesday: Typhoon Haiyan Relief Edition
Official GazetteDirect from the Office of the President of the Philippines.
UNICEFInspiring, enlightening updates from UNICEF’s humanitarian efforts around the world. Donations given now help supply health kits, hygiene kits, and clean water to affected Filipino communities.
Oxfam GBA look inside the lives of Filipino children currently living in evacuation zones. Citizens of Great Britain can donate £5 by texting DONATE to 70066.
Doctors Without BordersDocumenting their pursuit of a better cure for TB as well as their emergency responses to natural disasters. Cargo teams are currently prepping supplies to be sent to the Philippines, just one of the 60 countries Doctors Without Borders aids every year.
In Other NewsComprehensive but digestible daily round ups of what’s happening around the world. Stay updated on the most recent news from the Philippines, ways to help, and places to donate money to typhoon survivors.
For more ways to help our friends in the Philippines, look here.

staff:

Tumblr Tuesday: Typhoon Haiyan Relief Edition

Official Gazette
Direct from the Office of the President of the Philippines.

UNICEF
Inspiring, enlightening updates from UNICEF’s humanitarian efforts around the world. Donations given now help supply health kits, hygiene kits, and clean water to affected Filipino communities.

Oxfam GB
A look inside the lives of Filipino children currently living in evacuation zones. Citizens of Great Britain can donate £5 by texting DONATE to 70066.

Doctors Without Borders
Documenting their pursuit of a better cure for TB as well as their emergency responses to natural disasters. Cargo teams are currently prepping supplies to be sent to the Philippines, just one of the 60 countries Doctors Without Borders aids every year.

In Other News
Comprehensive but digestible daily round ups of what’s happening around the world. Stay updated on the most recent news from the Philippines, ways to help, and places to donate money to typhoon survivors.

For more ways to help our friends in the Philippines, look here.

jeffbernat:

This made me tear up a bit. Prayers to the motherland. #PrayForThePhilippines ☀

jeffbernat:

This made me tear up a bit. Prayers to the motherland. #PrayForThePhilippines ☀

(via ohdeezy)

Filipino Creation Story

loveisarevolutionaryact:

image

Creation Story

Acrylic and Marker on Wood

By JL

When the world first began there was no land; there was only the Sea and the Sky, and between them flew a huge, beautiful Kite (a bird similar to a hawk). One day, the bird, which had nowhere to land and rest, grew tired of flying about, and in frustration stirred up the Sky in a quarrel against the Sea. The Sky threw rain, thunder, and lightning that reached the Sea, who in turn rose up and hurled waves and hurricanes that reached the Sky.

 

In order to restrain its fury, the Sky showered a multitude of massive boulders down upon the Sea, which became the islands that formed the Philippines. These islands prevented the waters from rising any more - instead causing them to flow back and forth, and thereby creating the tides. Afterwards, the Sky then ordered the Kite to light on one of the newly-formed islands to build her nest, and to leave the Sea and the Sky in peace. 

Now at this same time the Land Breeze and the Sea Breeze had a child which they named Bamboo. One day, when Bamboo was floating against the sea, it struck the feet of the Kite. Shocked, hurt, and angered that anything should strike it, the bird furiously pecked at the bamboo until it split in half. Out of one section came a golden-bronze colored man, named Malakas (Strong One) and from the other half came a similarly hued woman, named Maganda (Beautiful One). In union they were birthed.

 

 

Man and Womyn, Pinoy and Pinay were born intertwined with one another, in balance and equality they were created.

 

As time has passed we forget the union that we were created in

We forget the seed that grew us,

And man and womyn, Pinoy and Pinay have divided. 

 

 

 

(Excerpt from The Journey of a Brown Girl: An Experimental Theatre Piece by Jana Lynne Umipig)

designersof:

Philippine classic snack brands.

designersof:

Philippine classic snack brands.

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“There was a person who stood up [after a screening] and said, ‘How could you make a movie that was so denigrating to your race?’,” explained John Cho, who plays Steve, while hanging near a basketball court at L.A.’s Pan Pacific Park. “[Ebert] stood up and said, ‘You wouldn’t say that to a white filmmaker,’ which is probably true.”

Once Ebert loudly came to the flick’s defense, people started paying attention, as he went on to say that Asian-Americans should be free to take on any types of roles they choose without fear of misrepresenting the entire community.

“What is interesting about this movie is, it doesn’t say, ‘This is an Asian-American movie,’ it just presents Asian-American characters,” Cho said, echoing Ebert’s sentiments. “The movie gives itself the freedom to paint negative portrayals.”

“It’s threatening to some people because they want a particular image,” he added. “And we’ve gone away from stereotypes in order to kind of negate these bad stereotypes. You see on TV, it’s all positive model minority cut-out [type characters] — it’s just a function in a scene. What this movie does is give you protagonists that are very deeply flawed. And I think in order for Asian-American cinema to progress, we need to have characters who are deeply flawed.”

And Shen, who plays the main character in “Better Luck Tomorrow,” feels like folks are getting it. “People came up to me and said, ‘After the first five minutes, I totally forgot you guys were Asian,’ ” he said. ” ‘Cause it has nothing to do with being Asian, it’s universal stuff about … kids. Not necessarily that they’re bad or evil, [just] that they sometimes make wrong decisions.” [mtvnews]

(Source: revlovejoy, via 3llwhy)

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(via leilockheart)2045. Japanese. Learn some basic Japanese with this cute list! 

ohmyasian:

(via leilockheart)

2045. Japanese. Learn some basic Japanese with this cute list! 

(Source: otakuheart, via chideltathetacultural)

Filipino Creation Story

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See. Love. Remember. Look back and smile. Scrapbook of videos, pictures, ideas, etc.

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